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Media Library

Create your own lesson plans and activities using the resources available here in this database, searchable by date, resource type, location, and topic. All resources in the curriculum—images, documents, maps, objects, audiovisuals, biographies, and vocab words—gathered in one easy-to-access location.

These resources included here were used in the "Moose on the Loose" curriculum. If you want access to the full catalog of objects, manuscripts, and archives in the New Hampshire Historical Society's collections, visit the online catalog on the Society's website at nhhistory.org.

Location: Other
Theme: Civics and Government, Economy, War, Women
Audiovisual

Speech by Eleanor Roosevelt

Each Sunday evening, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt spoke to the nation on the radio. This is part of her weekly radio broadcast on December 21, 1941, just a few weeks after the United States entered World War II.
Location: Statewide
Theme: Civics and Government, Politics
Biography

Bill Gardner

William M. “Bill” Gardner became the New Hampshire secretary of state in 1976. His job is to run all of the elections in New Hampshire. He also makes sure that everyone follows the election laws. Gardner believes that the New Hampshire primary is a really important tradition. Every four years, he picks the date for the New Hampshire primary. He...
Location: Great North Woods
Theme: Civics and Government, Politics
Biography

Neil Tillotson

Neil Tillotson was a successful businessman. In 1954, he bought the Balsams, a big hotel in the town of Dixville Notch. The nearest voting place was over 50 miles away, so Tillotson worked to have the Balsams named as the voting place for Dixville Notch. He helped make famous the tradition of voting at midnight by inviting the media to the...
Location: Statewide
Theme: Civics and Government, NH Firsts and Notables, Politics
Biography

Sherman Adams

Sherman Adams was the governor of New Hampshire during the 1952 primary. He was a friend of General Dwight D. “Ike” Eisenhower. He helped Ike win the New Hampshire primary that year on the Republican side. Then he traveled all over the country to help Ike win primaries in other states. After Ike became the president, Sherman Adams went to...
Location: Statewide
Theme: Immigration, Politics
Document

No Democrat or Irish Need Apply

Irish-Catholic immigrants faced discrimination when they arrived in the United States, and as a result sometimes had a hard time finding jobs or housing. This is the headline from a poster that criticized both the Irish and members of the Democratic party. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, the Democratic party reached out to the Irish and...
Location: Statewide
Theme: Civics and Government, NH Firsts and Notables, Symbols of NH
Document

“Chapter 152: An Act Establishing the State Motto”

Laws of the State of New Hampshire (Concord, 1945)
John Stark’s famous phrase, “Live Free or Die,” officially became the state motto of New Hampshire in 1945 as World War II came to an end. The motto is considered to summarize the ideals of the American Revolution, as well as the independent nature of the people of New Hampshire.
Location: Statewide
Theme: War, NH Firsts and Notables, Symbols of NH
Document

"Twelve Hundred Freemen Rejoicing in Commemoration of the Glorious Victory"

Green-Mountain Farmer, Bennington, Vermont, August 21, 1809
In 1809, John Stark was invited to a dinner in Bennington, Vermont, to commemorate the anniversary of the historic battle. Unfortunately, Stark’s advanced age and ill health prevented him from attending. Instead he sent a letter to be read aloud at the dinner, honoring the veterans. The letter included the statement, “Live free or die, death is...
Location: White Mountains
Theme: Environment and Natural Resources, Tourism, Symbols of NH
Document

Engraving of Profile Mountain/Old Man of the Mountain

N. and S.S. Jocelyn in American Journal of Science and Arts, 1828
There are several conflicting accounts about the discovery of the Old Man of the Mountain. However, most of the accounts agree that the granite profile was first seen—other than presumably by Native Americans—around 1805 and that it was first noticed by members of a surveying party working and camping in Franconia Notch near Ferrin’s Pond (later...
Location: Other
Theme: Civics and Government, War, NH Firsts and Notables
Document

Letter, General John Stark to the Committee of Safety of New Hampshire, August 18, 1777

John Stark
As a commanding officer at the Battle of Bennington, one of General John Stark's responsibilities was to write this detailed account of the battle. Stark sent this report to New Hampshire’s committee of safety. The committee of safety was the governing body of New Hampshire when the provincial assembly was not in session.
Location: Statewide
Theme: Colonization and Settlement
Document

Gorges and Mason Naming Their Provinces

This cartoon imagines Captain John Mason and Sir Ferdinando Gorges naming their colonies.